PACE https://pacetoday.com.au Process & Control Engineering Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:17:10 +0000 en-AU hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.4.2 https://pacetoday.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/prime-creative-media-50x50.png PACE https://pacetoday.com.au 32 32 Extensometer for equipment safety applications https://pacetoday.com.au/extensometer-equipment-safety-applications/ https://pacetoday.com.au/extensometer-equipment-safety-applications/#respond Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:17:10 +0000 http://pacetoday.com.au/?p=43837 The VPG Transducers brand of Vishay Precision Group, has introduced its Model 182 extensometer, a high-performance strain gauge-based force sensor. It expressly designed for industrial, EN15000 and EN280 compliant off-highway vehicle and equipment safety applications. The Model 182 extensometer accurately measures deformation, or changes in the length of a solid structural body, with a 500 … Continue reading Extensometer for equipment safety applications

The post Extensometer for equipment safety applications appeared first on PACE.

]]>
The VPG Transducers brand of Vishay Precision Group, has introduced its Model 182 extensometer, a high-performance strain gauge-based force sensor.

It expressly designed for industrial, EN15000 and EN280 compliant off-highway vehicle and equipment safety applications.

The Model 182 extensometer accurately measures deformation, or changes in the length of a solid structural body, with a 500 μƐ full-scale sensing range and necessary redundancy for EN15000 and EN280 compliance in safety applications.

Its robust design consists of a high-quality strain gage sensing element, housed in a highly corrosion resistant coated alloy steel, with mounting via two bolt holes (M10 12.9 required). Units are IP67 rated for dust and moisture protection, ensuring their continued reliability and repeatability in demanding environments.

Multiple output choices, including mV/V, 4-20 mA and 0-10 V, are available as standard, along with alternate connection options. For vehicle safety applications, customers can select from either a CAN Open or SAE J1939 protocol, with further choice of a DT or M12 connector. Please consult VPG Transducers for details.

Typical applications for the Model 182 include off-highway vehicle, telescopic handler and lifting machinery measurements. The extensometer is especially well-suited for applications where safety and device stability are of critical importance for operator injury risk mitigation and prevention, including where stringent vehicle compliance with EN15000 and EN280 standards may be required.

It may be further specified for the accurate onboard vehicle machinery and chassis safety monitoring of construction equipment, scissor lifts, boom lifts, forklifts, and materials handling equipment. Here, the extensometer effectively supports various lifting and loading scenarios, including overload measurements.

The post Extensometer for equipment safety applications appeared first on PACE.

]]>
https://pacetoday.com.au/extensometer-equipment-safety-applications/feed/ 0
Aussie inventors world leaders in holographic technology https://pacetoday.com.au/43832-2/ https://pacetoday.com.au/43832-2/#respond Thu, 22 Jun 2017 03:54:45 +0000 http://pacetoday.com.au/?p=43832 Adelaide-based Voxon Photonics is changing the way that we interact with digital 3D content with its Volumetric Display technology, a  combination of hardware and software that enables multiple people to explore and manipulate complex data in a collaborative and socially engaging way, and all without having to wear special glasses or headgear. Co-founders Will Tamblyn … Continue reading Aussie inventors world leaders in holographic technology

The post Aussie inventors world leaders in holographic technology appeared first on PACE.

]]>
Adelaide-based Voxon Photonics is changing the way that we interact with digital 3D content with its Volumetric Display technology, a  combination of hardware and software that enables multiple people to explore and manipulate complex data in a collaborative and socially engaging way, and all without having to wear special glasses or headgear.

Co-founders Will Tamblyn and Gavin Smith, along with the rest of the Voxon Photonics team, believe that a clear technical vision supported by focus, discipline and determination can potentially lead to some of the most ground-breaking inventions on the planet.

The technology has been over nine years in the making, and their first product, the Voxon Photonics VX1, is an intricate blend of photonics, electronics, mechanics and optimised software.

The Voxon team is pioneering new ways of manipulating and control millions of points of light with micro-second precision. Like a lot of technological startups, the company’s beginnings were modest – in the shed, experimenting with laser pointers, lathes and lawnmower engines.

Investment to date equates to a $1 million in private syndicated seed round, a $50,000  grant from the University of South Australia’s Venture Catalyst Program, and a $25,000 grant from the AMP Tomorrow Fund. The team completed the Venture Dorm program at the New Venture Institute at Flinders University and have based their headquarters at the Centre for Advanced Manufacturing at Tonsley.

Voxon’s technology is currently being evaluated by companies around the world as well as  in South Australia. Medical Imaging, advertising, simulation, education, video gaming and archaeology are among the use cases that are currently being explored.

It is envisioned that doctors would potentially be able to see and rotate the human heart holo image in full 3D creating the basis for a safer and more complete operating environment. Similarly medical students now have access to a more informative, interactive and intensive medial training by utilising this technology.

 

The post Aussie inventors world leaders in holographic technology appeared first on PACE.

]]>
https://pacetoday.com.au/43832-2/feed/ 0
Carbon neutral fuel within reach https://pacetoday.com.au/carbon-neutral-fuel-within-reach/ https://pacetoday.com.au/carbon-neutral-fuel-within-reach/#respond Thu, 22 Jun 2017 01:48:24 +0000 http://pacetoday.com.au/?p=43826 A catalyst that uses the sun to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) into synthetic natural gas is making carbon neutral fuel a viable option. Researchers from the University of Adelaide in South Australia in collaboration with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have developed a technique of combining CO2 with hydrogen to produce almost … Continue reading Carbon neutral fuel within reach

The post Carbon neutral fuel within reach appeared first on PACE.

]]>

A catalyst that uses the sun to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) into synthetic natural gas is making carbon neutral fuel a viable option.

Researchers from the University of Adelaide in South Australia in collaboration with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have developed a technique of combining CO2 with hydrogen to produce almost pure methane.

Combining hydrogen with CO2 to produce methane is considered a safer option than using hydrogen directly as an energy source and allows the use of existing natural gas infrastructure.

With previous catalysts there have been issues with poor CO2 conversion, unwanted carbon-monoxide production, catalyst stability, low methane production rates and high reaction temperatures.

Using a catalyst synthesised with porous crystals called metal-organic frameworks, researchers were able to minimise carbon-monoxide production.

The research has been published online ahead of print in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A.

Lead author Renata Lippi said the process only required a small amount of the catalyst, which increased its economic viability.

“Natural gas is already in use but it is a fossil fuel and is one of the main fuels used in many industrial activities,” she said.

“The problem with that is we are getting carbon stored underground but with this synthesis, organic CO2 in a gas form and reacting with hydrogen, we can make synthetic natural gas without adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. We would be recycling.

“We use a really high flow of gas and still we reach almost full conversion of the reagents.”

Lippi said hydrogen could be efficiently produced with solar energy and combining it with CO2 to produce methane was a safer option than using hydrogen directly.

The process proved to be highly stable even under high continuous reaction for several days and after shutdown and exposure to air.

The catalyst also operated at mild temperatures and low pressures, making solar thermal energy possible.

Lippi said the next step was improving methods for CO2 capture and developing a hydrogen electrolysis method so the whole process could be integrated into the same plant.

According to BP, global gas production was 3551.6 billion cubic metres in 2016.

With the large global push for more renewable energy and the existing infrastructure for natural gas, there is huge potential for effective use of this new technique.

“What we’ve produced is a highly active, highly selective (Producing almost pure methane without side products) and stable catalyst that will run on solar energy,” said project leader Christian Doonan.

“This makes carbon neutral fuel from CO2 a viable option.”
Read more at http://www.ferret.com.au/articles/news/carbon-neutral-fuel-within-reach-n2528625#6S7lliEC4pE3DjkB.99

The post Carbon neutral fuel within reach appeared first on PACE.

]]>
https://pacetoday.com.au/carbon-neutral-fuel-within-reach/feed/ 0
Australia could be left behind in energy stakes https://pacetoday.com.au/electricity-generation-set-change-forever/ https://pacetoday.com.au/electricity-generation-set-change-forever/#respond Thu, 22 Jun 2017 01:24:02 +0000 http://pacetoday.com.au/?p=43821 Australia risks being left in the dark ages if it doesn’t start taking energy reforms seriously and begin implementing strategies that will secure Australia’s energy future, according to Australia’s chief scientist Alan Finkel. Finkel made the observation at a keynote address at the National Press Club this week where he warned that energy generators, wholesalers … Continue reading Australia could be left behind in energy stakes

The post Australia could be left behind in energy stakes appeared first on PACE.

]]>
Australia risks being left in the dark ages if it doesn’t start taking energy reforms seriously and begin implementing strategies that will secure Australia’s energy future, according to Australia’s chief scientist Alan Finkel.

Finkel made the observation at a keynote address at the National Press Club this week where he warned that energy generators, wholesalers and retailers need to futureproof the supply.

One the back of his recently released report on the energy sector, Blueprint for the future, he said a key to securing the supply is understanding the number of technological disruptions that need to be taken into consideration by the market as consumer demand patterns change.

“One technological disruption is that ever cheaper wind and large scale solar, even without subsidies, are dominating investor interest,” he said. “Investors prefer wind and solar because they are now cheaper to build than traditional generation such as hydro and coal. Investors also like wind and solar because they can be rolled out in small steps, say 100 megawatts at a time.

“A second disruption is the nearly two million rooftop solar generators that householders have installed. The electrical load curve and the generation mix now ramp rapidly up and down during the day to the extent that it becomes difficult for slow-responding baseload generation to cope. The market into which coal generation operates has been forever changed.”

A third disruption is just beginning, he said, delivered courtesy of stunning improvements in battery capacity and cost. This is a grassroots revolution. It’s driven by billions of people wanting their smart phones and laptop computers to last longer between charges.

“To meet that market pull, global manufacturers have invested massively to improve the performance and lower the price of rechargeable batteries,” he said. “Re-purposing these batteries has enabled manufacturers to configure grid scale batteries. These are now being installed internationally at a level and cost that were unimaginable five years ago.

A fourth technological disruption results from the fast evolving digital technologies that dominate our lives. Digital technologies are poised to enhance our electricity system, allowing it to flexibly accommodate millions of distributed rooftop solar generators, two-way current flows and the connection of microgrids.
“The final disruption is that homeowners are becoming market participants,” said Finkel. “Empowered by friendly software, they are keeping tabs on their own power generation, storage, demand management and electric heat-pump heating.”

While Finkel was at pains to point out the system is not broken, the energy sector – along with both state and local governments – need to start thinking ahead about the country’s energy needs, and not keep their heads buried in the sand that it will be business as usual over the next decade.

“[Our energy needs] are at a critical turning point,” he said. “We must improve on what we have. Globally, policy makers and market bodies understand that the key driver of that change – technology – cannot be reversed.

“When we met our counterparts overseas, the thing that made the biggest impact on me was the long-term policy certainty in other countries, which enables them to efficiently plan for the energy transition.

“It is clear they are ahead of us. For example, Ireland has a multi-year program, Delivering a Secure, Sustainable Electricity System, to actively integrate renewables into the power system. The United States has the Quadrennial Energy Review, to enable the modernisation and transformation of the electricity system. And New York has the Reforming the Energy Vision strategy, which establishes targets for emissions reductions, renewable generation and energy efficiency in buildings. These examples illustrate the need for us to adopt a more proactive approach in Australia.”

The Review not only stipulated that the market had to think outside traditional spheres of generation. However, he also said fossils fuels were not to be taken out of the mix.

“Reliability, security, lowest cost, and reduced atmospheric emissions are the critically important outcomes,” said Finkel.

“The generation mix is an input. The exact mix of coal, gas, solar, wind and hydro is not important as long as the outcomes are met. To minimise future price increases we will need a diverse energy mix, including fossil fuels.”

Finkel believes if Australia doesn’t act now, its energy future will be less secure, more unreliable and potentially costly. He reiterated the point by stating that even though scientists use the term, business as usual when modelling in a specific way, there is actually no such thing because the system is dynamically evolving.

“The past is gone,” he said. “To preserve a stable system at lowest cost we need to embrace that future. Embrace. Not race. Move too slowly and we will miss out on what the future offers. Move too quickly and we put at risk the stability and affordability of our electricity system.”

 

The post Australia could be left behind in energy stakes appeared first on PACE.

]]>
https://pacetoday.com.au/electricity-generation-set-change-forever/feed/ 0
Failsafe power helping to eliminate hospital blackouts https://pacetoday.com.au/failsafe-power-helping-eliminate-hospital-blackouts/ https://pacetoday.com.au/failsafe-power-helping-eliminate-hospital-blackouts/#respond Tue, 20 Jun 2017 05:19:26 +0000 http://pacetoday.com.au/?p=43817 Whether in operating theatres or looking after patients in intensive care wards, a reliable power supply is essential for a modern hospital. If the power and therefore the medical life support equipment should fail during a surgical procedure, the consequences would be unimaginable. That’s why energy supply systems in hospitals are doubly or even triply … Continue reading Failsafe power helping to eliminate hospital blackouts

The post Failsafe power helping to eliminate hospital blackouts appeared first on PACE.

]]>
Whether in operating theatres or looking after patients in intensive care wards, a reliable power supply is essential for a modern hospital. If the power and therefore the medical life support equipment should fail during a surgical procedure, the consequences would be unimaginable.

That’s why energy supply systems in hospitals are doubly or even triply protected via emergency generators and battery buffers. Ultimately you want to leave nothing to chance in this situation.

Whether willingly or out of necessity, situations do arise where users need to switch back and forth between individual power supplies. For technical reasons, it’s not simply a case of flicking a switch and then all systems continuing to work as before.

The contactors and shunt releases installed in the network must be in a defined state when the switch is made. If not the system may break down, with resulting consequences for the expensive switchgear.

Depending on the situation, people in the immediate vicinity may also be put at risk.

A couple of years ago, White Technics was awarded a challenging contract by a hospital operator in a northern suburb of Melbourne. White Technics had a wide range of experience in the planning and implementation of complex supply and energy technology installations.

“The task we were set was to develop a simple, reliable solution, which would bring the alternative power generator online quickly and safely, whenever a changeover was required”, recalled Moffat.

Two independent substations supply power to this particular hospital. If these are unavailable, a diesel generator steps in.

If the power supply is shut down by the hospital during maintenance work or by the electricity supplier (a so-called brownout) the necessary switching arrangements can be made without any time pressure. In contrast, in the event of an unforeseeable power outage (also known as a blackout), the second substation or generator must come online immediately and seamlessly, without even a momentary failure of the hospital’s critical systems.

For a redundant energy supply system to come online safely, a reliable entity must poll the status of the installed contactors and shunt releases within the shortest time possible.

The same applies if the reason for the shutdown (brownout or blackout) has been found and rectified: before being reset to the original power source, safe signals must be polled again and the current flow aligned synchronously to each power source.

“As we were already familiar with Pilz and its competence in integrated solutions for control and safety tasks, we decided to turn to the safe automation experts from Pilz Australia with this challenge”, said Moffat.

Both companies developed an efficient safety concept based on the automation system PSS 4000. From a central control room, the system was intended to be able to communicate with the substation of the respective power grid, as well as with the generator.

As part of the automation system PSS 4000, the control system PSSuniversal monitors status inputs from each shunt release and contactor on the substations of the individual power grids.

Safety relays PNOZsigma from Pilz control the circuit breakers via contactors. The automation system PSS 4000 also sends this information to the engineering office for diagnostic purposes.

As the substations and the control room are around 800 metres apart, the connection between the control level and the remote I/Os in the field was implemented via fibre-optic cable and the real-time Ethernet SafetyNET p from Pilz.

“The ability to use the safe Ethernet protocol SafetyNET p via fibre-optic cable was an important prerequisite for our project”, Frank White is keen to stress. SafetyNET p networks all the control components and transfers data for safety-related and non safety-related control tasks in one system.

With the software platform PAS4000, the Program Editor PASmulti and EN/IEC 61131-3 Editors, the automation system is easy and flexible to manage. The hospital’s maintenance team receives detailed diagnostics in the control room, without having to enter any high voltage areas. As a result, technical problems can be resolved quickly and safely.

In this case, the integrated solution for control and safety tasks is suitable for both simple and complex applications. As it has a modular structure, it can be expanded any time to suit your requirement. Integration does not require any complex installation or handling processes.

Today the hospital engineers are happy with the performance of the automation system PSS 4000 controlling the switching of HV power supplies and overall smooth trouble-free operation over the past four years of the initial Installation.

For that reason, they have now commissioned White Electrics to expand the automation system to include “Safe Control” of the “Low-Voltage Circuit Breakers”.

“The ability to expand PSS 4000 is so easy to undertake that even further expansion is planned to be installed over the next two years”, concludes Frank White and adds, that it is a very successful project and a “win-win” for all those concerned.

“In the end, the key factor in selecting the automation system PSS 4000 from Pilz was that the complete solution for control and safety tasks, with its smart diagnostic functions, was simpler and more economical than comparable solutions from other suppliers”, said Moffat.

What’s more, with its decentralised IO modules it is small, compact and requires little space in the control cabinet.

So the Industry 4.0-compatible automation system PSS 4000, already established in industry has now arrived in building electrics and automation.

As in automated production plants, it provides protection for people operating in the area and saves expensive equipment from damage.

The post Failsafe power helping to eliminate hospital blackouts appeared first on PACE.

]]>
https://pacetoday.com.au/failsafe-power-helping-eliminate-hospital-blackouts/feed/ 0