Cambridge Wastewater pipe upgrade complete

The Western Australian government, through the Water Corporation, has refurbished 4.4 kilometres of wastewater pipes in the Town of Cambridge to extend the life of this infrastructure by at least 50 years.

The $3.4 million project, which began in March and finished early July, forms part of an ongoing program to reline and refurbish wastewater pipes across the State.

The project involved trenchless technology as it minimises the impact on the community. The technology works by inserting a plastic strip liner inside an existing wastewater pipe via access chambers that is then wound down the length of the pipe route. The wound plastic liner is then expanded to fit tightly within the walls of the existing pipe to provide a smooth finish.

This work helps prevent pipeline corrosion, reduce the likelihood of blockages and extend the life of this important infrastructure by at least five decades.

“I am pleased this important project to renew aging wastewater pipes in the Town of Cambridge, was completed on time and under budget,” said state water minister Dave Kelly.

“Relining old wastewater pipes is important to protect the local wastewater systems and the health of the community and environment.

“Trenchless technology was used to reline wastewater pipes where possible, to minimise the impact on the community by reducing the need for extensive excavation.”

Since 2015, around 60 kilometres of wastewater pipeline across Western Australia has been refurbished through the program.

Water Corporation safely treats wastewater from homes and businesses across the State through more than 16,000 kilometres of wastewater mains.

The project was completed by Australian company Interflow and involved 40 local workers.